Espierspectives

Literature 101

ELEMENTS: Theme 20/10/2010

Filed under: Elements — espierspectives @ 10:13 AM

THEME

What exactly is a theme of a story, and how can I recognize it?

The theme of a story is what the author is trying to convey — in other words, the central idea of the story. Short stories often have just one theme, whereas novels usually have multiple themes. The theme of a story is woven all the way through the story, and the characters’ actions, interactions, and motivations all reflect the story’s theme.

But don’t confuse theme with the story’s plot or moral. The plot is simply what happens in the story and the order of the story’s events, and the moral is the lesson that the writer wants the main character (and by extension, you) to learn from the story. Each of these serves the overall theme of the story. That is, the events of the story illustrate the theme, and the lesson that you learn relates directly to the theme.

So when you’re trying to recognize the theme of a story, ask yourself what the author is trying to convey through the characters and events of the story. For instance, in The Catcher in the Rye, Holden Caulfield’s actions are motivated by his not wanting to grow up, so one of the main themes of this novel is the preservation of innocence.

Advertisements
 

ELEMENTS: Theme

Filed under: Elements — espierspectives @ 10:09 AM

THEME

What exactly is a theme of a story, and how can I recognize it?

CliffsNotes.com. What exactly is a theme of a story, and how can I recognize it? 20 Oct 2010
http://www.cliffsnotes.com/Section/id-305408,articleId-8034.html.

The theme of a story is what the author is trying to convey — in other words, the central idea of the story. Short stories often have just one theme, whereas novels usually have multiple themes. The theme of a story is woven all the way through the story, and the characters’ actions, interactions, and motivations all reflect the story’s theme.

But don’t confuse theme with the story’s plot or moral. The plot is simply what happens in the story and the order of the story’s events, and the moral is the lesson that the writer wants the main character (and by extension, you) to learn from the story. Each of these serves the overall theme of the story. That is, the events of the story illustrate the theme, and the lesson that you learn relates directly to the theme.

So when you’re trying to recognize the theme of a story, ask yourself what the author is trying to convey through the characters and events of the story. For instance, in The Catcher in the Rye, Holden Caulfield’s actions are motivated by his not wanting to grow up, so one of the main themes of this novel is the preservation of innocence.

 

 

PROF NIEVES BENITO EPISTOLA 01/10/2010

Filed under: Annals — espierspectives @ 9:58 AM

In yet another quest for anything about my former professors, I find this link about my adviser on Research:

http://www.brooksidebaby.com/

Brookside Baby seems to be a very good, intimate friend of Prof E  because she knows a lot about her and her husband; that in every word she pens about the good professor, the kind lady comes alive again in my mind, and I look back to the times when I’d see her in class…a bespectacled lady, most distinguished-looking granny.  She had been very patient with my research, my final academic requirement which took me to the big libraries in the metro.

From Brookside’s blog I get this excerpt:

Why do you feed your students?

Nieves Benito Epistola, professor emeritus of the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of the Philippines Diliman, was often asked this through much of her career that spanned 51 years. Her answer remained the same: “There are three good reasons for doing things. The first important need is physiological; the second, to have security or a sense of belonging, and the third, self-actualization.”

She used to say, whenever she was assigned to a 7 a.m. or a 12 noon class, “How can you expect them to learn if they are hungry? Communication is easier if you eat the same things. On the metaphorical level, you give them nourishment for the mind.”

I do remember one afternoon, because our class was in the afternoon, first period after lunch… Prof E brought us  some  candy…the soft chewy White Rabbit from China.  I think she just got back from a foreign trip…yeah, most probably from some parts of China…if not Hongkong, then Beijng.

The last time I saw her was when I gave her her copy of my Research and had some forms signed.  My  research was late, but she had it ante-dated, for graduation purposes.  She was THAT kind.

 

BOOK REPORT

Filed under: Books — espierspectives @ 8:45 AM

Topics to Include in Your Report:


When you write your report, try to cover as many of the following topics as you can:

  • Setting: Describe the setting or settings of the book. Note where the action takes place and when. Have you ever been to a place like that? Did you like it or not? Would you like to be in a place and time like that described in the book?
  • Main Character: Write about the main character, including what they are like, what they look like, what they like to do, and so on. Does the character change, learn, or grow in the story? If so, describe how and why this happens. Would you like to be friends with this character?
  • Other Characters: List the other characters in the books and give some characteristics for each.
  • Which characters did you like/dislike?: State why you liked/disliked certain characters. Did any of the characters do things that you think are wrong, noble, risky, etc?
  • What happened at the beginning of the story?: How does the story start? Usually this is where the characters are introduced to us and the problem is stated.
  • What happened in the middle of the story?: This is usually where we find out a lot about the characters and the story becomes more exciting.
  • What happened at the end of the story?: This is usually where the main problem in the book is resolved.
  • What was the problem in the story and how was it solved?: What was the big problem in the story, how was it solved, who solved it. and why?
  • What did you learn from this story?: The best books leave the reader with a lot to think about and learn.
  • Theme/Main Idea: What was the main idea or theme of the book? Some stories have a moral (like Aesop’s fables), while others try to teach a life lesson.
  • Do you like this story?: Tell if you liked or disliked this story and why you did or didn’t like it.

    excerpted from: http://www.enchantedlearning.com/report/book/

    You might wanna try these links if you need help with your book reports:

    http://www.writinghelp-central.com/book-report.html

    http://www.ldam.org/pdf/bkreport_temp_sedita.pdf

    http://www.infoplease.com/homework/wsbookreporths.html

     

     
    %d bloggers like this: